Saturday

The Target Hack, And Smart Cards

So-called "smart" credit cards (EMV chip-based cards) are used in many parts of the world, but not in the USA. The technology has been a available for several years, and would have made the recent theft of credit and debit card data from Target customers much more difficult, if not impossible. While you may be able to request EMV chip cards from various banks and other places, you also need to use them at a location which supports the technology, in order for this type of protection to be effective.
The bottom line is that credit card users can get the more secure EMV-equipped cards if they want them, but those customers have to know where to call because not all card issuers offer them. Adding to the confusion, some card issuers only offer the more secure card to some, but not all, their customers. And, of course, some credit card issuers, including some major banks, don't and do not plan to do so.
The real sticking point here appears to be the banks, some of which apparently don't want to offer the increased security of the EMV card to their customers because it would raise their costs slightly. Other credit card issuers will send out the more secure EMV card on request to some, but usually not all, their customers. But in the United States, none of the banks are making the secure card their default.
eWeek

The bottom line is that credit card users can get the more secure EMV-equipped cards if they want them, but those customers have to know where to call because not all card issuers offer them. Adding to the confusion, some card issuers only offer the more secure card to some, but not all, their customers. And, of course, some credit card issuers, including some major banks, don't and do not plan to do so. - See more at: http://www.eweek.com/security/credit-card-firms-endanger-customer-privacy-with-outdated-technology.html#sthash.wJ2B3ndY.dpuf

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